Muji – No Name Brand Done Right

by Ed Lau on September 22, 2008

Muji, Tokyo, Japan

Generic brands here in North America are done with a sort of emphasis on cost cutting rather than quality and aesthetics. In Japan, however, label-less clothes, furniture, food and everyday products have a sort of zen stylishness. One of my favorite stores in Tokyo is epitomous with this minimalistic chic. Muji, which is derived (according to Wikipedia) from Mujirushi Ryōhin, which means “No Name Quality Goods”.

It’s the sort of store you might end up with if you mixed an IKEA with Banana Republic and a Staples. If you find yourself living in Tokyo for an extended period of time, Muji is probably the place you’d want to stop by to get yourself some reasonably priced household essentials.

Muji, Tokyo, Japan

Although the clothing at Muji is mostly simple, classic colors and designs, they’ve garnered much praise from many of Japan’s top clothing designers. Heck, you can even buy bicycles and food at Muji.

Muji, Tokyo, Japan

I still have a couple of the things I got from Muji, which had a small store just outside my apartment in Sangenjaya and many around Tokyo, including a cushion I got because the chair for the desk at my place was so horribly uncomfortable and a few plastic boxes I used to keep my stuff from smashing in my suitcase. Oh, and some pomegranate incense. I really started to like incense after seeing so many different kinds in Tokyo. The Neighborhood store in Harajuku, in particular, smells great.

Muji, Tokyo, Japan

Muji, Tokyo, Japan

Anyways, if you need some basics for life in Tokyo, Muji is a great place to start.

in Travel

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Custom T-Shirts Toronto September 23, 2008 at 6:38 am

You’re right, it totally reminds me of Ikea — right down to the washroom and wall signs.

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Bob Buskirk September 29, 2008 at 11:36 am

Def looks like ikea! Very intriguing place

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Interests Are Free January 20, 2010 at 10:23 pm

Shop here all the time! There’s one here in NYC behind the Times building.

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